Required Summer Reading List and Assignments for 2017-2018 School Year

Studies have shown that students can lose a month or more of academic progress if they do not continue reading over the summer.  As a school, we are committed to providing your child with a rigorous learning environment, which includes maintaining high expectations over the summer.  Therefore, the Literacy teachers at Baldi Middle School have instituted a mandatory summer reading assignment for students at all grade levels.  

Directions: Please select one novel from the list below.  The list provides three options with three different Lexile levels.  The Lexile level corresponds with the difficulty of a text.  If you are a strong, proficient reader you may want to choose the novel with a higher Lexile.  If you struggle to read a novel, you may want to choose the novel with a lower Lexile.  If you need help selecting a novel, speak with your current Literacy teacher who can point you in the right direction.  You will then complete the assignment and assessment as instructed on the back.  You are not required to purchase the novel.  You may borrow the novel from a library or download on an E-Reader. 

If you have any questions about Summer Reading, please contact Mrs. Nuskey (jllevy@philasd.org) before Wednesday, June 21st.  We hope you enjoy your summer and look forward to seeing you in the fall.

 


6th Grade

  1. Wonder: R.J. Palacio (Lexile: 790)

You can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.  My name is August. I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.
August Pullman wants to be an ordinary ten-year-old. He does ordinary things. He eats ice cream. He plays on his Xbox. He feels ordinary – inside.  But Auggie is far from ordinary. Ordinary kids don’t make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds. Ordinary kids don’t get stared at wherever they go. Born with a terrible facial abnormality, Auggie has been home-schooled by his parents his whole life, in an attempt to protect him from the cruelty of the outside world. Now, for the first time, he’s being sent to a real school – and he’s dreading it. All he wants is to be accepted – but can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, underneath it all? Narrated by Auggie and the people around him whose lives he touches forever, Wonder is a funny, frank, astonishingly moving debut to read in one sitting, pass on to others, and remember long after the final page.

  1. Hoot: Carl Hiaasen (Lexile: 760)

Unfortunately, Roy’s first acquaintance in Florida is Dana Matherson, a well-known bully. Then again, if Dana hadn’t been sinking his thumbs into Roy’s temples and mashing his face against the school-bus window, Roy might never have spotted the running boy. And the running boy is intriguing: he was running away from the school bus, carried no books, and–here’s the odd part–wore no shoes. Sensing a mystery, Roy sets himself on the boy’s trail. The chase introduces him to potty-trained alligators, a fake-fart champion, some burrowing owls, a renegade eco-avenger, and several extremely poisonous snakes with unnaturally sparkling tails.  Roy has most definitely arrived in Carl Hiaasen’s Florida.

  1. Stargirl: Jerry Spinelli (Lexile: 590)

From the day she arrives at quiet Mica High in a burst of color and sound, hallways hum “Stargirl.” She captures Leo Borlock’s heart with one smile. She sparks a school-spirit revolution with one cheer. The students of Mica High are enchanted. Until they are not. Leo urges her to become the very thing that can destroy her – normal.

 

Assignment #1:  Reading Log to be completed during summer break

Due: Tuesday, September 5th to Grade 6 Literacy Teacher

 

  • Create five journal entries for the novel you select.  For each journal entry choose a significant quote from the novel.

 

 

  • Write the quote and record the page number on which the quote is found.

 

  • Explain the significance of the quote: What does the quote show about the characters, setting, conflict, plot or theme?  Can you make any text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connections?  

 

 

  • You may use the following sentence starters for assistance if necessary:
  • This reminds me of…
  • This made me wonder…
  • I think _________ will happen next because
  • This quote means…
  • If I were (name of character), I would…
  • It seems fair/unfair that…

 

 

  • Your journal entries should be 5-7 sentences each.  All journals need to be typed using 12-point font, Times New Roman and double spaced lines.  If you do not have access to a computer over the summer, you may hand-write your journals using blue or black ink.  Your journals will count as a writing grade for the 1st marking period.  

 

Assignment #2:  Multiple Choice Assessment: Will be completed after summer break

Assessment Window: Tuesday, September 5th– Friday, September 15th

You will be given a multiple-choice assessment on the novel you chose to read over the summer.  You will take the assessment in your Literacy class on the date your Literacy teacher assigns it and will count as a test grade for the 1st marking period. You will not be permitted to use the novel on the assessment.  Below is a sample study guide for how to best prepare.  

As you read your novel, take note of the following:

  1. Main Characters
  2. Critical Minor Characters
  3. Plot (Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution)
  4. Sequence of events
  5. Conflicts throughout the novel
  6. Setting and/or how the setting changes throughout the novel
  7. Characters interactions with one another, feelings, emotions, actions
  8. Possible themes or lessons

7th Grade

  1. Freak the Mighty: Rodman Philbrick (Lexile: 1000)

Grade 6-9-A wonderful story of triumph over imperfection, shame, and loss. Large, awkward, learning-disabled Maxwell Kane, whose father is in prison for murdering his mother, and crippled, undersized Kevin are both mocked by their peers; the cruel taunting they endure is all too realistic and believable. The boys establish a friendship-and a partnership. Kevin defends them with his intelligence, while Max is his friend’s “legs,” affording him a chance to participate in the larger world. Inspired by tales of King Arthur, they become knights fighting for good and true causes. But Kevin’s illness progresses, and when he dies, Max is left with the memories of an extraordinary relationship and, perhaps, the insight to think positively about himself and his future. The author writes with empathy, honoring the possibilities of even peripheral characters; Kevin and Max are memorable and luminous. Many YA novels deal with the effects of a friend dying, but this one is somewhat different and very special.

  1. The Giver: Lois Lowery (Lexile: 760)

Featuring photographic artwork from the feature film on the cover, this handsome edition of The Giver  is perfect for fans of the movie and the literary classic. Lois Lowry’s 1994 Newbery Medal–winning tale has become one of the most influential novels of our time. The haunting story centers on Jonas who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity and contentment. Not until he is given his life assignment as the Receiver of Memory does he begin to understand the dark, complex secrets behind his fragile community.

  1. The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson and the Olympians Book 1: Rick Riordan (Lexile: 740)

Percy Jackson is a good kid, but he can’t seem to focus on his schoolwork or control his temper. And lately, being away at boarding school is only getting worse-Percy could have sworn his pre-algebra teacher turned into a monster and tried to kill him

Assignment #1:  Reading Log to be completed during summer break

Due: Tuesday, September 5th to Grade 7 Literacy Teacher

 

  • Create five journal entries for the novel you select.  For each journal entry choose a significant quote from the novel.

 

 

  • Write the quote and record the page number on which the quote is found.

 

 

  • Explain the significance of the quote: What does the quote show about the characters, setting, conflict, plot or theme?  Can you make any text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connections?  

 

 

  • You may use the following sentence starters for assistance if necessary:
  • This reminds me of…
  • This made me wonder…
  • I think _________ will happen next because
  • This quote means…
  • If I were (name of character), I would…
  • It seems fair/unfair that…

 

 

  • Your journal entries should be 5-7 sentences each.  All journals need to be typed using 12-point font, Times New Roman and double spaced lines.  If you do not have access to a computer over the summer, you may hand-write your journals using blue or black ink.  Your journals will count as a writing grade for the 1st marking period.  

 

Assignment #2:  Multiple Choice Assessment: Will be completed after summer break

Assessment Window: Tuesday, September 5th– Friday, September 15th

You will be given a multiple-choice assessment on the novel you chose to read over the summer.  You will take the assessment in your Literacy class on the date your Literacy teacher assigns it and will count as a test grade for the 1st marking period. You will not be permitted to use the novel on the assessment.  Below is a sample study guide for how to best prepare.  

As you read your novel, take note of the following:

  1. Main Characters
  2. Critical Minor Characters
  3. Plot (Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution)
  4. Sequence of events
  5. Conflicts throughout the novel
  6. Setting and/or how the setting changes throughout the novel
  7. Characters interactions with one another, feelings, emotions, actions
  8. Possible themes or lessons

8th Grade

1.Lord of the Flies: William Golding (Lexile: 790)

William Golding’s compelling story about a group of very ordinary small boys marooned on a coral island has become a modern classic. At first it seems as though it is all going to be great fun; but the fun before long becomes furious and life on the island turns into a nightmare of panic and death. As ordinary standards of behaviour collapse, the whole world the boys know collapses with them—the world of cricket and homework and adventure stories—and another world is revealed beneath, primitive and terrible. Labeled a parable, an allegory, a myth, a morality tale, a parody, a political treatise, even a vision of the apocalypse, “Lord of the Flies” has established itself as a true classic.

2.The Five People You Meet In Heaven: Mitch Albom (Lexile: 780)

Eddie is a wounded war veteran, an old man who has lived, in his mind, an uninspired life. His job is fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. On his 83rd birthday, a tragic accident kills him as he tries to save a little girl from a falling cart. He awakes in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a destination, but an answer. In heaven, five people explain your life to you. Some you knew, others may have been strangers. One by one, from childhood to soldier to old age, Eddie’s five people revisit their connections to him on earth, illuminating the mysteries of his “meaningless” life, and revealing the haunting secret behind the eternal question: “Why was I here?”

  1. Feed: Matthew Tobin Anderson

Assignment #1:  Reading Log to be completed during summer break

Due: Tuesday, September 5th to Grade 8 Literacy Teacher

 

  • Create five journal entries for the novel you select.  For each journal entry choose a significant quote from the novel.

 

 

  • Write the quote and record the page number on which the quote is found.

 

 

  • Explain the significance of the quote: What does the quote show about the characters, setting, conflict, plot or theme?  Can you make any text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connections?  

 

 

  • You may use the following sentence starters for assistance if necessary:
  • This reminds me of…
  • This made me wonder…
  • I think _________ will happen next because
  • This quote means…
  • If I were (name of character), I would…
  • It seems fair/unfair that…

 

 

  • Your journal entries should be 5-7 sentences each.  All journals need to be typed using 12-point font, Times New Roman and double spaced lines.  If you do not have access to a computer over the summer, you may hand-write your journals using blue or black ink.  Your journals will count as a writing grade for the 1st marking period.  

 

Assignment #2:  Multiple Choice Assessment: Will be completed after summer break

Assessment Window: Tuesday, September 5th– Friday, September 15th

You will be given a multiple-choice assessment on the novel you chose to read over the summer.  You will take the assessment in your Literacy class on the date your Literacy teacher assigns it and will count as a test grade for the 1st marking period. You will not be permitted to use the novel on the assessment.  Below is a sample study guide for how to best prepare.  

As you read your novel, take note of the following:

  1. Main Characters
  2. Critical Minor Characters
  3. Plot (Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution)
  4. Sequence of events
  5. Conflicts throughout the novel
  6. Setting and/or how the setting changes throughout the novel
  7. Characters interactions with one another, feelings, emotions, actions
  8. Possible themes or lessons